Not so long ago, robust e-commerce solutions first appeared on the Internet and changed the retail dynamic for good. The mail order industry morphed into the online shopping industry. Companies all across the world added e-commerce solutions overnight, dramatically increasing the overall data load on the Internet. Now fundamental shifts in the architecture behind the Internet are once again causing sweeping changes, and although they are less visible they may place an unmanageable strain on a small web host.

The technology industry would love to create an Internet that knows what you want before you do and that buys it before you can say no. To that end, the driving force of new technology development is to create solutions that make the Internet as intuitive as possible and that make the online experience as responsive as possible to impulse.

To become more intuitive, technology is also becoming more inquisitive. When you’re browsing the Internet, for example, the browser you’re using and the sites you visit are probably learning about you. Sometimes you volunteer information, such as when you “like” something on a social media site. But much of the data that is gathered is not provided intentionally.

This is why our browsing experience is so impacted by social media. If you “like” a local restaurant on your social network to show your support and a friend of yours living in your town searches for the word “restaurant” while he’s logged into his social network, he’ll get that restaurant’s page at the top of his results. If a friend is logged in while viewing media on some sites, the videos he sees and articles he reads will automatically be shared with his friends.

This stuff is what I call “draconian cool.” It is cool. You can’t deny that. It makes the experience of the Internet hugely more intimate; it shrinks its massive size down through the same personal filters that we use to shrink the real world. But it’s also weirdly Orwellian. I’d kind of like to think of my business as being my business; I don’t like the idea that everything I do is being recorded and studied.

The bottom line is that computing is getting faster and more powerful, and that as computers can handle more data they can collect more data. As they collect data they get smarter and more able to customize a user’s experience to his demonstrated preferences. A more intuitive and responsive Internet requires less of users.

For companies that operate websites, however, it requires more. As Internet users become increasingly wrapped up in their comfortable little “like” bubbles, surrounded more and more by content they are likely to enjoy because they enjoyed something similar, companies have to learn how to access those like bubbles, or they will rapidly become invisible.

Unfortunately, remaining competitive requires immense data power, and many smaller web hosting companies simply lack the technical resources to provide that kind of power. Many of them are working to partner with farms that can provide that power, but in the meantime it’s a good idea to get in touch with your web host to make sure it is keeping in sync with changes in web dynamics.

I’m a website hosting professional specializing in web hosting. You may also be interested in reading more information about Windows VPS server hosting at http://www.accuwebhosting.com/windows-vps-server-hosting.html

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